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How to Recover Deleted Files in Linux

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HowTos

Oops! You accidentally deleted files that you were supposed to submit in 2 hours! Trust me, even the smartest of geeks have been in such situations. And yes, it’s not the lack of technological savoir-faire that puts people in such tough spots; it’s just the general clumsiness and nervousness in certain situation that makes us make such blunders.

On Windows and Mac, you can simply Google for it and you’ll find a plethora of sharewares and freewares that will help you recover files. However, on Linux, there’s a dearth of such applications thus making it harder for new users to get back the files they deleted. Don’t worry though, as we at TechSource have listed a simple method of getting back the stuff you lost without going through hoops. So, without much ado, here’s how to recover deleted files on Linux:

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