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Ubuntu Adoption Grew 160% in India Last Year

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India is surely getting open to open source. Don't believe it? Well, in that case you gotto read this one. Canonical's CEO has revealed that Ubuntu adoption in India increased by about 160 per cent last year.

Speaking to, Jane Silber, chief executive officer, Canonical said, “We have chosen India for our biggest retail expansion after China because we see tremendous opportunity and growth in this country. India is one of the countries where Ubuntu is most successful and well received. We see significant growth in Ubuntu adoption in India. Over the last year we saw 160 per cent growth. So, we believe that there is real potential and demand here. I would like to make special mention of our partners because this is done with them. So we can go to the market through our OEMs. Canonical is not building computers and Canonical does not have stores. Our OEM partners know very well and have much more data than we do about the many machines that ship in India with Ubuntu pre-installed. Our OEM partners believe that we can grow with proper marketing and education.”

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