Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Free Software Foundation: Ubuntu's Secure Boot Plan Won't Fly

Filed under
Ubuntu

There's still no end in sight to the ongoing Secure Boot saga arising from Microsoft's Windows 8 plans, and just recently we've seen both Fedora Linux and Ubuntu Linux respond with two very different approaches to working around the problem.

Both the Linux Foundation and the Free Software Foundation voiced their own perspectives last fall when the issue first came up, but over the weekend the Free Software Foundation felt the need to speak out again in response to the approaches being taken by these two popular distributions.

In a nutshell, the advocacy group isn't thrilled with what either distro has proposed, but it prefers the Fedora approach over Canonical's solution. It also has a number of suggestions of its own.

Rest here




More in Tux Machines

4 Tools for Network Snooping on Linux

Computer networking data has to be exposed, because packets can't travel blindfolded, so join us as we use whois, dig, nmcli, and nmap to snoop networks. Do be polite and don't run nmap on any network but your own, because probing other people's networks can be interpreted as a hostile act. Read more

Google’s Fuchsia OS on the Pixelbook: It works! It actually works!

Google currently has two OSes on the market: Android and Chrome OS. The company is never one to leave a successful product alone in the marketplace, though, so it's also developing a third operating system called "Fuchsia." When we last checked in on the experimental OS in May 2017, calling it an "OS" was a bit of a stretch. We only got the system UI up and running on top of Android, where it then functioned like an app. The UI offered a neat multi-window system, but mostly it was just a bunch of placeholder graphics. Nothing worked. It has been hard to check in on Fuchsia since. The Fuchsia system UI, which was written with a cross-platform SDK called "Flutter," quickly shut down the Android (and iOS) compatible builds. Fuchsia has a Vulkan-based graphics stack, and no emulator supports the new-ish graphics API. The only way to get Fuchsia up and running again was with actual hardware, and the only supported devices were Intel NUC PCs from 2015 and the Acer Switch Alpha 12 laptop. Read more

today's howtos

Games: Super Blood Hockey, Starship Titanic and More