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Firefox, Thunderbird Wrecking Relationships

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Humor

Web browser bugs are routinely blamed for creating huge networks of compromised PCs and undermining the safety of ecommerce transactions. Now one woman says a "security bug" in Mozilla led to the break up of her engagement.

The anonymous woman shared a Windows PC with her former fiancé. Both had separate user logins on the same machine and both preferred Mozilla to Internet Explorer. All was apparently well until the woman opened up a list of sites whose password was never saved and unearthed evidence that her man was a frequent visitor of dating websites. The woman took this as evidence of infidelity and split up with the apparent love cheat. She then had the presence of mind to report the privacy flaw to the Mozilla Foundation.

"This privacy flaw has caused my fiancé and I to break-up after having dated for five years... Firefox should be respecting every single area of privacy per user on one system. It's not doing that," the woman writes.

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In related news:

Hot on the heels of a woman who blames a bug in Firefox for exposing the flaws in her relationship with a fiancé comes the tale of a young lad whose relationship was hit by the spam filtering shortcomings of Thunderbird, the email client companion of Firefox.

"Last year, my girlfriend of 15 months went away to Costa Rica on a World Challenge team. Her mobile wouldn't be working, but she said she would call when she got a chance," Reg reader Matt writes.

"Unfortunately, she emailed me first, and the email was binned by Thunderbird's mail filter. When she didn't receive a reply, she mailed me again... and again. I'm sure the rest will be obvious," he adds.

That Story.


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