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Korean company's tiny quad-core ARM Linux computer packs a punch at $129

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Little Linux computers have attracted a lot of interest from hobbyists this year. The $35 Raspberry Pi ARM board, which met with huge demand when it launched in February, is a compelling solution for affordable embedded projects. But what if you need more power than the 700MHz ARM11 board can offer?

A Korean hardware manufacturer called Hardkernel is launching a high-end alternative. The company’s new ODROID-X board comes with a Samsung Exynos 4 processor, a quad-core CPU clocked at 1.4GHz. The board also has a quad-core Mali 400 GPU, 1GB of RAM, six USB host ports, an ethernet adapter, headphone and microphone jacks, and an SDHC card slot for storage.

Rest here




Why a display processor without a display?

I must have missed something. Even the summary lists a Mali 400 GPU, but when you view the board or further specifications, no display connection is listed or visible.

Two display options

There is a mini HDMI and you can get a module that plugs into the black slot to add a host of extras including a choice of a 10" or 13.3" LCD panel. Have a look on their web site at the accessories.

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