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GNOME implodes - again

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Gnome imploding again.

The solution for GNOME to stop bleeding away users is simple. Bring back a fresh updated GNOME 2 and then if they must adapt G3 as a "Leet" version for mobiles.

Unity and GNOME 3 have done more harm to desktop users than anything over the last 5 years. It may have gained a few windows converts to the pushy_clicky_phoney DE but both DE's have lost far more support than they have gained.

Only my twopennuth YVMD

re: gnome imploding

I contend the same holds true for KDE, perhaps to a lesser degree, but KDE users still feel the squeeze of tiny-screen march too. I still don't like KDE 4 and I feel stuck in it. As bad as it is, it's still the best out there. It feels like the old desktop users who loyally used their product, and many of which helped promote, were just cast aside for the new hip smart phone crowd who is not interested in the things that made KDE & GNOME great. This is a fickle crowd who will follow the leader to the latest greatest thing. By the time GNOME and KDE figure it out, they'll be relics whose old base has moved on or died.

re: Gnome KDE futures

Agreed the same does hold true for KDE. However if we take the longer term view I guess its just evolution really. Survival of not the fittest but the strongest newest or biggest. Gnome and KDE have chased many desktop users over to other DE's and as is the nature of the beast these DE's will now in turn grow and mature due to extra use and activity. Hopefully they will have learnt many lessons from the Gnome and KDE wars and not get too bloaty or extreme without user support.

The future may or may not be rosey for Linux distros. It sure will be different.

Ray Smile

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