Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Three Top Ubuntu Alternatives

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Over the past few years, I've come to the conclusion that cutting-edge software availability is the leading indicator of which Linux distribution I'm going to end up with. Perhaps this is why I've found myself flailing into the arms of Ubuntu and Ubuntu-based distributions recently? More often than not, I can find the software I want with a deb package or PPA ready to go.

It's time savers like the one mentioned above that has made non-Ubuntu centric distributions not worth spending much time with. It's not a lack of ability on my end, rather it's a lack of wanting to spend a weekend setting up a new installation just to meet my needs. My time is valuable, so any distribution I select to meet my needs will be reflective of this.

In this article, I will be looking at distributions based on Ubuntu and/or Debian (only), then exploring what makes each spin-off unique.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Photon Could Be Your New Favorite Container OS

Containers are all the rage, and with good reason. As discussed previously, containers allow you to quickly and easily deploy new services and applications onto your network, without requiring too much in the way of added system resources. Containers are more cost-effective than using dedicated hardware or virtual machines, and they’re easier to update and reuse. Best of all, containers love Linux (and vice versa). Without much trouble or time, you can get a Linux server up and running with Docker and deploying containers. But, which Linux distribution is best suited for the deployment of your containers? There are a lot of options. You could go with a standard Ubuntu Server platform (which makes installing Docker and deploying containers incredibly easy), or you could opt for a lighter weight distribution — one geared specifically for the purpose of deploying containers. Read more

Dell offers new Ubuntu certified range of workstations

Dell has launched a range of workstations offering the Linux-based Ubuntu operating system out of the box. There are five new computers in the Precision series, and they come with Canonical certification meaning users don't have to worry about incompatibility issues. The Precision 5720, sports a 27-inch screen and comes with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS support. Along with an AMD Radeon Pro WX graphics card, you can choose between Intel Xeon, 6th Generation and 7th Core processors. Read more Also: Not to worry, Dell will bring Ubuntu to the early 2018 Intel 8th gen. XPS 13 'developers edition' Dell shuns Windows 10 with launch of five Linux-powered PCs

KDevelop 5.2.1 released

Just a few days after the release of KDevelop 5.2.0, we today provide a stabilization and bugfix release with version 5.2.1. This is a bugfix-only release, which introduces no new features and as such is a safe and recommended update for everyone currently using KDevelop 5.2.0. You can find the updated Windows 32- and 64 bit installers, the Linux AppImage, as well as the source code archives on our download page. Read more

Rugged, octa-core hacker board has 2GB RAM

FriendlyElec’s $75 “NanoPC-T3 Plus” SBC runs Linux or Android on an octa-core -A53 Samsung SoC, and features 2GB DDR3, 16GB eMMC, and -40 to 80℃ support. FriendlyElec announced the original NanoPC-T3 SBC in April 2016, back when the company still called itself FriendlyARM. The community backed board, which was a processor and RAM upgrade to the NanoPC-T2, has now been further enhanced with a new NanoPC-T3 Plus model. Read more