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LibreOffice 3.6 is ready for us.

I read this article by Susan Linton at Ostatic: http://ostatic.com/blog/libreoffice-3-6-0-is-here. Linton's article intrigued me enough to go to the LibreOffice site (libreoffice.org) and see more of the changes and claims offered.

The added word count, changing font size from a keyboard short-cut were enough for me to check out adding this do my system.. I hope you see the breadth of the changes which may to also take the next step and install LibreOffice 3.6.

I know, I know, it is best to install your packages only through your Linux distribution's repository, and wait for updates that have been checked out.
However, since LibreOffice 3.6 is faster loading and comes some nice new features spread throughout the Suite, this may be the time NOT to wait.
Here are some pointers:
When you download the compressed package from the libreoffice and unpack it, it creates a folder (for example, mine was named 'LibO_3.6.0.4_Linux_x86-64_install-deb_en-US'). Opening this you will find two other folders, DEBS and readmes. All the instructions and commands to cut and paste into your terminal are included in a file within the readmes folder. Just be sure to UNINSTALL any current libreoffice version before you begin.

I had no trouble following the instructions and am now enjoying this snappy, new version of LibreOffice.
This was tested in my Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon. If your distro is related, you may discover the same ease at making this worthwhile installation.

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