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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 470

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Linux

Welcome to this year's 34th issue of DistroWatch Weekly! Browsing the Internet while preserving one's privacy and anonymity is becoming increasingly hard in today's online world. Luckily, with Linux and free software there are still some options that allow users to stay incognito in hostile environments. One of the projects providing an easy live CD with extensive privacy protection features is the Gentoo-based Liberté Linux; Jesse Smith takes a first look at the distribution's latest release in this week's feature article. In the news section, Arch Linux developers battle with resistance to change after switching to systemd, Damn Small Linux announces return to active development after four years of dormancy, NetBSD introduces automated system rebuilds and package upgrades, and Debian GNU/Linux celebrates its 19th birthday. Also in this week's issue, a look at the current situation in the trouble Mandriva Linux project and an update on Secure Boot from BSD's perspective. Finally, we introduce Saluki Linux, a Puppy-based distribution featuring the Xfce desktop. Happy reading!

Content:

Reviews: Liberté Linux - a secure way to communicate?
News: Arch switches to systemd, Damn Small Linux gets resurrected, NetBSD introduces sysupgrade, Mandriva launches foundation, Debian celebrates 19th birthday
Questions and answers: Secure Boot and BSD
Released last week: AV Linux 6.0, BlankOn 8.0, Frugalware Linux 1.7
Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 12.04.1
New additions: Saluki Linux
New distributions: INX, Trinacria Linux, YunoHost
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