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Disney sitcom says open source is insecure

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Shake it Up, a Disney sitcom that screens on The Disney Channel around the world, has slipped in an insult to open source software.

The show, which tracks the activities of a group of aspiring dancers on a TV show called "Shake it Up, Chicago", appears to be aimed at tweens. We make that assertion based on the age of comments on its web site, the brightly-coloured costumes and crudely-stereotyped big-brush-strokes characters.

In the offending episode one such character, a squeaky-voiced, glasses-and-argyle-jumper-wearing kid who is clearly meant to be a nerd, is asked to fix another character's stricken computer.

rest here

That little prick must

That little prick must pay!!!1 Bwahahaa

too funny

They even have the code to fix it Tongue

It's funny when they do this on TV. they make up random sentences from a "few technical" words and expect viewers to think they makes sense.

Edit: I see the problem now. the virus was hidden in the opensource Tongue

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