Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Four Ways to Speed Up Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Mostly the Windows users look for posts like this that helps in improving the performance of the operating system. Windows is known to get “tired” couple of months (days as well, in some cases) after the installation. Linux users, on the other hand, hardly cares about improving the computer speed (read performance). Ubuntu is the most widely used Linux distribution across the globe, fast, sleek, stylish and powerful. But just because it is fast does not mean that it cannot be made faster. In this post we will see some tips that can help you to speed up Ubuntu.

1. Reduce application start up time with Preload:

Preload is a daemon that runs in background and analyzes the user behavior and tracks what applications are being used frequently. Based on these analysis, it predicts what application the user might run next and fetches those binaries and their dependencies into memory and thus increases the startup time of the application.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Linux and Linux Foundation

Security Leftovers

Qt 5.10 and digiKam

  • Qt 5.10 Platform Support Changes Being Discussed
    Qt developers have begun a fresh round of discussions over the supported platforms / operating systems of Qt 5.10 that will be released in the later part of this calendar years. Among the officially supported Linux distribution changes would be moving to RHEL 7.3, openSUSE Leap 42.2, Ubuntu 17.04 (still keeping around 16.04 LTS too), moving the Windows MinGW to MinGW 6.3, and more.
  • digiKam – A Professional Photo Editing and Management Software
    digiKam is an advanced cross-platform digital photo management app inspired by photographers’ needs to view, tweak, enhance, organize, and share photographs across Linux systems. It possesses all the tools and feature set necessary to process, manage, organize, and transfer photographs, videos, and RAW files – while consistently receiving optimization upgrades to its feature set and workflow.

GNOME/Unity in Ubuntu