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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 473

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Linux

Welcome to this year's 37th issue of DistroWatch Weekly! This has been another exciting week in the world of Linux. The openSUSE project has release version 12.2 of its distribution. The new release comes after a two-month delay to fix bugs and add polish to the latest version of the popular distro; time will tell if the new release was worth the wait. Another fascinating release comes from the Qubes OS project which attempts to improve desktop security through the increased isolation of different tasks. Read more about both of these distribution releases below. Also in this edition of DistroWatch Weekly we talk about Debian's most popular architecture and which versions of the Linux kernel receive long-term support, and we also link to a talk regarding Google's custom desktop distribution. Plus we are happy to announce that the Slackware project is putting together a vast collection of knowledge with the help of its community members - get all the details below. This week Jesse Smith tells us about a book which tries to teach people how to use the Linux command line; read on to find out how well the book works as an educational tool. As usual we will take a look back at the distributions released over the past week and look forward to those soon to come. Finally, do not miss our roundup of reviews, podcasts and newsletters from all around the web. Until next time, we wish you a pleasant week and happy reading!

Contents:

Book Review: The Linux Command Line
News: Slackware's new documentation project, Debian's most popular architecture, changes to Ubuntu's ISO images, a look at Google's desktop
Questions and Answers: The Linux kernel and long-term support
Released last week: openSUSE 12.2, Arch Linux 2012.09.07, SystemRescueCd 3.0.0
Around the web: Reviews, podcasts and newsletters
New additions: Qubes OS
New distributions: Jondo Live-CD, Mozillux
Reader comments

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Getting started with the Notepadqq Linux text editor

I don't do Windows. The operating system, I mean. At least, not on my own computers and not with any of my own work. When I was a consultant, I often had to work out of my clients' offices, which meant using their hardware, which also meant using Windows at many of those offices. Even when using Windows, I tried to install as much open source software as I could. Why? Because it works as well as (if not better than) its proprietary equivalents. One of the applications I always installed was Notepad++, which Opensource.com community moderator Ruth Holloway looked at in 2016. Read more

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