Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A Silicon Valley fairy tale-- Apple at 30

Filed under
Mac

Apple Computer Inc. turns 30 on April Fool's Day.

It was three decades ago when a pair of prank-loving college dropouts, who also shared an interest in electronics, created computer circuit boards in a Cupertino garage, named the product Apple I and sold it to a local computer store.

To get the fledgling business off the ground, Steve Jobs, the entrepreneur, sold his Volkswagen van, while Steve Wozniak, the engineer, peddled his prized Hewlett-Packard calculator to raise money for their operation.

Since then, Apple has had wild successes as well as utter failures. But there is little doubt about the far-reaching impact the company has had in many areas. Apple popularized the graphical user interface, bringing the mouse along with it. The company also championed desktop publishing. Most recently, it revolutionized the digital entertainment world with its combination of the iPod music player, iTunes software and online iTunes Music Store.

Full Story.

Steve Wozniak says he never intended to change the world. That was the other Steve, Steve Jobs.

He just wanted to build computers. Oh, and he really -- really -- wanted to spend his career as a Hewlett-Packard engineer, a position he reluctantly left.

Life turned out very differently for the self-trained electrical engineer. In 1976, he and Jobs started Apple Computer, which would help launch the personal computer revolution. Observers say Apple would never be what it is today without either Steve -- Jobs, the tech evangelist and visionary, and Wozniak, whose technical genius created computers for the masses.

``I didn't want to start this company,'' said Wozniak, known in Silicon Valley simply as ``Woz.'' ``My goal wasn't to make a ton of money. It was to build good computers. I only started the company when I realized I could be an engineer forever.''

Full Interview

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Peppermint 7 Released

Peppermint 7 launched a few days ago. Peppermint is a lightweight Ubuntu-based Linux distribution with an emphasis on speed and simplicity. Although the name is similar to Linux Mint, the projects aren't directly related. Peppermint originally was envisioned as a "spicier" alternative to Mint—whatever that means! Many distros come with a wide assortment of feature-rich applications, and that's great for power users who need those apps. But older machines can struggle to cope with those demanding distros. Peppermint solves the problem by offering a carefully curated suite of web apps that perform tasks traditionally handled by native apps. It's an approach that will be familiar to any Chromebook users reading this article. Read more

Why I’m Unlikely to Ever Return Microsoft’s Love

Every time I write an article criticizing the depth of Microsoft’s proclaimed love of Linux, as well as questioning the motive behind it, I receive return criticism, often from places I would’ve, in the past, least expected, such as from within the GNU/Linux community. In places like Slashdot, some open source subreddits, and even occasionally on FOSS Force, there are commenters who accuse me of letting the past blind me to the great work that Microsoft is now doing for Linux and open source. Read more

Google open sources SwiftShader