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My impressions of Ubuntu/Unity 12.04

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I've been using Ubuntu 12.04 on my MSI netbook for about a week now. The netbook is a 10" model with a 1.66 Gig dual core Intel Atom N280 CPU, 1 Gig of RAM and Intel Mobile 945GSE Integrated Graphics, 3 USB ports, VGA out, and Microphone and Headphone sockets, and an SD card slot.

I've been using it with Ubuntu Studio, with XFCE desktop and Audio applications, but became quite annoyed with it because it kept losing the network applet, and it never seemed to connect with the wireless network unless I was within a meter of the transmitter.

So as I had a copy of Ubuntu on hand, I decided to give that a go.

Rest here

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