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Vector Linux review

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Linux

After a very busy month, I finally had some free time to try Vector Linux, a distro that a facebook friend told me to take a look at. For those of you that dont know, Vector Linux is a distro that has been around for quite a long time. It is based on Slackware, with Xcfe, KDE and LXDE as the available desktop environments. According to the official website, the aim of Vector is to keep the distro simple and small and let the end user decide what their operating system is going to be.

Download and first impressions

The download page of Vector Linux will remind you of Windows, there are several editions for you to download. The standard edition uses Xcfe, the Light edition uses LXDE and the SOHO one uses KDE. I decided to download the standard live edition, there is no torrent download option though. The size of the ISO file is over 700 MB, exceeding the size of a CD so you will need either a DVD or a USB to try and install Vector.

rest here




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