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Future of the Desktop

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As the journey toward a web-only platform continues – if that’s where we are heading – the question becomes: What will be the role of Linux within such an environment?

When the Mozilla Foundation released its 2012 roadmap for Mozilla-related products earlier this year, the question became pertinent again.

The news from Mozilla, was that the foundation and its commercial subsidiary, Mozilla Corporation, will create their own mobile platform within a project known as Boot to Gecko. The roadmap described the new platform:

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