Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Ubuntu has a bigger problem than its Amazon blunder

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are many things that comprise a successful Linux distribution, but there may be none more important than trust. Before you build a production Linux system, you have to trust that the distribution isn't going to contain malicious code or back doors or any number of other potentially major problems. Since the advent of Linux, this really hasn't been an issue.

In the rare occasions that back doors or spyware have been injected into a particular Linux distribution, the nature of the open source community is such that it has been discovered and patched quickly. But we're talking about clandestine operations here, such as a bad actor unrelated to the distribution getting access to the source tree and injecting their bad code in the mix.

Rest here




Ubuntu+Amazon+Shuttelworth=Failure

This article is right on. I don't understand how anyone could possibly think this was a good idea. If I want search results from Amazon or any other store, I will open a browser and do a search from there.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Simon Phipps on Public Domain and Facebook’s React Licence

  • Public Domain Is Not Open Source
    Open Source and Public Domain are frequently confused. Here’s why it’s a mistake to treat the two terms as synonyms. Plenty of people assume that public domain software must be open source. While it may be free software within your specific context, it is incorrect to treat public domain software as open source or indeed as globally free software. That’s not a legal opinion (I’m not a lawyer so only entitled to layman’s opinions) but rather an observation that an open source user or developer cannot safely include public domain source code in a project.
  • 5 Reasons Facebook’s React License Was A Mistake
    In July 2017, the Apache Software Foundation effectively banned the license combination Facebook has been applying to all the projects it has been releasing as open source. They are using the 3-clause BSD license (BSD-3), a widely-used OSI-approved non-reciprocal license, combined with a broad, non-reciprocal patent grant but with equally broad termination rules to frustrate aggressors. The combination represents a new open source license, which I’ve termed the “Facebook BSD Plus Patent License” (FB+PL), and to my eyes it bears the hallmarks of an attempt to be compatible with both the GPL v2 and the Apache License v2 at the same time, in circumvention of the alleged imcompatibility of those licenses.

Red Hat Shares/Stock News

AMD With Linux: AMDGPU, AMDGPU-PRO, and RadeonSI

Games for GNU/Linux