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Calligra Productivity Suite: Too Much Trouble

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Software

The Calligra Suite is an unusual compilation of office tools with much potential -- but it has a good deal of maturing to do before it can advance beyond its mediocre performance following a debut almost three years ago.

Calligra is a fork of KDE's KOffice that grew out of unresolved disputes among KOffice developers. The project team recently announced the second stable release. Aside from its package availability only in the Ubuntu repository, Calligra has limited access through cumbersome archived files. So installing it in distros other than Ubuntu Linux requires a series of steps involving uncompressing and compiling.

I was looking forward to using Calligra for its innovative interface. However, the user experience and the strained functionality soon soured that enthusiasm.

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