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An interview with Allan Day

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Software
Interviews

A few days ago I had the great pleasure to interview Allan Day, GNOME designer and enthusiastic contributor.

Me: Hello Allan, mind presenting yourself?

Allan: I’m a designer working on the GNOME Project. I’ve been involved for quite a few years now. Last year I was lucky to be hired by Red Hat to work in their Desktop Team.

Me: Can you tell us something more about GNOME 4? Can we alias it GNOME OS?

rest here




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