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A Linux user switches to DOS, Part Two

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Last week I set a goal for myself: To live entirely in DOS for one week, in order to demonstrate how “old” technology is just as viable and usable as modern tech. Also it sounded like fun.

And fun it was. Challenging? Yes. At times, rather frustrating? You betcha. But it was definitely fun, and with a number of surprising up-sides. Enough up-sides, in fact, that I think I’ll keep on using at least some parts of my fancy DOS setup for the foreseeable future.

Let’s talk for a moment about my initial setup. I first started with VirtualBox running MS-DOS. Then, I began pulling together my needed DOS software collection (in part from floppies pulled out of a box in my closet), the key parts of which I am going to list below in order to help those interested in trying something similar:

rest here

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