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CrunchBang 'Waldorf' - Second Time Lucky

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Linux

I downloaded the latest testing image 20120927 of the upcoming CrunchBang 11 (direct link to download page here) because I prefer to have newer software on this Acer 5551 laptop that is used for everything including gaming and multimedia, but also because it wouldn't be fair to compare an old stable release with ArchBang which is based on the rolling Arch Linux and by definition much more up to date than even Debian Testing. However, I also downloaded the stable 'Statler' release BPO (updated from backports) of CrunchBang 10. Both are 32-bit this time as I'm hoping to do some gaming in the future if it sticks. The distribution is available as x64 builds as well.

I checked the live session on a Dell Latitude with Intel chip and on the Acer laptop with Broadcom 43225 wireless, and then undertook to install the test build first on the internal hard drive on sda8 and CrunchBang stable on an external USB drive in Icybox. This time I used my trusty Corsair Flash Voyager and unetbootin as I had freshly run out of CD's.

Rest here




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