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Open source computing started with the bicycle

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OSS

Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst used his company's Boston user summit this June to explain the core concept behind open source innovation and Computer Weekly reported on the former Delta Airlines chief's comments at that time.

Whitehurst reminded us that it was only 100 years between the invention of the 'autolathe' machine to manufacture "standard components parts" in physical engineering such as the standard screw and, then, subsequently, the invention of the combustion engine and the jet plane.

Standard component parts in the form of nuts, bolts and screws opened the door to innovation in this case.

rest here




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