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Amarok Celebrates 10 Years

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Amarok, popular KDE music manager, is turning 10 years old this month and the project is taking this opportunity to review the last year and look head to the future. Amarok 3 will debut at FOSDEM next February, and planning has already begun. So, it's time for the team to raise some money.

Amarok 1.0 appeared on the scene in the Summer of 2004, but dot releases had been introducing Linux users to this rocking piece of software for a couple of years by then. Its popularity was already growing. 10 years have passed and version 2.6, released August 14, 2012, is the current stable release.

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