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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 479

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Welcome to this year's 43rd issue of DistroWatch Weekly! It was a busy week here at DistroWatch as we worked to keep up with all of the new releases notices, especially those coming out of the Ubuntu community. Canonical launched version 12.10 of the Ubuntu distribution and it was quickly followed by several community editions, you can get all the details below. While Canonical and friends certainly took a great deal of the spotlight this week, other exciting releases also arrived. The continuation of KDE 3.5, Trinity, launched a new release as did the highly flexible NetBSD project. We also bring you news this week of Linux-based mobile operating systems looking to break into the expanding market of tablets and smart phones. Plus we cover bug report statistics being compiled by Debian developers. In our feature article this week Jesse Smith takes the Zentyal distribution, a project targeting small business servers for a test run. Read on to find out how the distribution fairs in functionality and friendliness. Also in this week's edition we cover podcasts, reviews and newsletters from Around the Web, we look forward to releases to come and we talk about the various ways available to shut down a Linux distribution. We here at DistroWatch wish you a pleasant week and happy reading!


Review: Qubes OS and Zentyal
News: Debian users report fewer bugs, Trinity releases bug fixes, NetBSD and Ubuntu release new versions and Android gets some competition.
Questions and Answers: Initiating a Halt
Released last week: CrunchBang Linux 11 R20121015, BlankOn 8.0 "Sajadah", OpenELEC 2.0, NetBSD 6.0, Ubuntu 12.10
Upcoming releases: Fedora 18 Beta, ROSA 2012.1 Beta2, Mandriva Linux 2012, OpenBSD 5.2
Around the Web: Reviews, podcasts and newsletters
New additions: OpenELEC
New distributions: Santoku
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Learning The Linux File System

Before we get started, let’s avoid any confusion. There are two meanings to the term “File System” in the wonderful world of computing: First, there is the system of files and the directory structure that all of your data is stored in. Second, is the format scheme that is used to write data on mass storage devices like hard drives and SSD’s. We are going to be talking about the first kind of file system here because the average user will interact with his or her file system every time they use a computer, the format that data is written in on their storage devices is usually of little concern to them. The many different file systems that can be used on storage is really only interesting to hardware geeks and is best saved for another discussion. Now that that’s cleared up, we can press on. (Read the rest at Freedom Penguin)

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