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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 479

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's 43rd issue of DistroWatch Weekly! It was a busy week here at DistroWatch as we worked to keep up with all of the new releases notices, especially those coming out of the Ubuntu community. Canonical launched version 12.10 of the Ubuntu distribution and it was quickly followed by several community editions, you can get all the details below. While Canonical and friends certainly took a great deal of the spotlight this week, other exciting releases also arrived. The continuation of KDE 3.5, Trinity, launched a new release as did the highly flexible NetBSD project. We also bring you news this week of Linux-based mobile operating systems looking to break into the expanding market of tablets and smart phones. Plus we cover bug report statistics being compiled by Debian developers. In our feature article this week Jesse Smith takes the Zentyal distribution, a project targeting small business servers for a test run. Read on to find out how the distribution fairs in functionality and friendliness. Also in this week's edition we cover podcasts, reviews and newsletters from Around the Web, we look forward to releases to come and we talk about the various ways available to shut down a Linux distribution. We here at DistroWatch wish you a pleasant week and happy reading!

Content:

Review: Qubes OS and Zentyal
News: Debian users report fewer bugs, Trinity releases bug fixes, NetBSD and Ubuntu release new versions and Android gets some competition.
Questions and Answers: Initiating a Halt
Released last week: CrunchBang Linux 11 R20121015, BlankOn 8.0 "Sajadah", OpenELEC 2.0, NetBSD 6.0, Ubuntu 12.10
Upcoming releases: Fedora 18 Beta, ROSA 2012.1 Beta2, Mandriva Linux 2012, OpenBSD 5.2
Around the Web: Reviews, podcasts and newsletters
New additions: OpenELEC
New distributions: Santoku
Reader comments

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: KDE/Qt

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • DNS server attacks begin using BIND software flaw
    Attackers have started exploiting a flaw in the most widely used software for the DNS (Domain Name System), which translates domain names into IP addresses. Last week, a patch was issued for the denial-of-service flaw, which affects all versions of BIND 9, open-source software originally developed by the University of California at Berkeley in the 1980s.
  • Researchers Create First Firmware Worm That Attacks Macs
    The common wisdom when it comes to PCs and Apple computers is that the latter are much more secure. Particularly when it comes to firmware, people have assumed that Apple systems are locked down in ways that PCs aren’t. It turns out this isn’t true. Two researchers have found that several known vulnerabilities affecting the firmware of all the top PC makers can also hit the firmware of MACs. What’s more, the researchers have designed a proof-of-concept worm for the first time that would allow a firmware attack to spread automatically from MacBook to MacBook, without the need for them to be networked.

Brocade CEO: Transition To Open Source Will Be Difficult For Cisco

Communications CEO Lloyd Carney said traditional vendors like Cisco will have a tough time adapting to a more software-defined, open source space. That's because traditional vendors like Cisco's revenue streams are tied to closed architectures, Carney said. Read more