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Linux Format 165 On Sale Today - Raspberry Pi Supercharged

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Linux

Supercharge your Raspberry Pi. It's project awesome!

Take control of your telly, your devices that run embedded Linux and more, as we uncover the potential of the Raspberry Pi. With a bit of patience, a soldering iron and a couple of circuit boards, you can even use one to control an LED display to light up your favourite winter-based religious festival.

Also in the mag you can delve in to the labyrinth of patents to get some background on how it all relates to free software, take your first steps with the Django web development framework and create a simple Dropbox clone that you can use without fear the The Man is snooping on your stuff. We look at Bitcoin, we make a mess with Inkscape, and we scratck our heads and wonder why the excellent Ubuntu has taken such a nosedive with its most recent release.

On the DVD we’ve got the latest-and-greatest version of Slackware, the completely free (as in speech and as in beer) Trisquel, the tiny Core Plus and the lightweight AntiX.

For a complete issue overview, and subscriber PDFs, take a look at our archives: http://www.linuxformat.com/archives?issue=165

Digital Editions: Linux Format is available on both Apple's iPhone/iPad/Touch and Android devices through Zinio. You can also purchase individual copies from the Ubuntu Software Centre. The Canonical status for Issue 165 is currently 'Review in progress', so it should be up soon.

Copied and pasted from Tuxradar.com

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