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BeOS-inspired operating system Haiku hits new milestone

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OS

Haiku, an open source project inspired by BeOS, has hit a new milestone, with developers releasing Alpha 4 of the operating system.

More than 1000 bugs were fixed in the new release, and improvements include a new native debugger; upgraded graphics, networking and wireless support; and enhancements to the BFS file system.

The release notes state that one of the goals for Alpha 4 "was to provide current and future Haiku developers an updated and (mostly) stable operating system to work on their software projects. Therefore we have included the basic build tools. This release of Haiku is capable of building and running binaries using either GCC 2 or GCC 4. The use of GCC 4 is discouraged however if not absolutely necessary, as no API compatibility is guaranteed with future versions of Haiku."

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