Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mozilla Does An Open-Source SWF Runtime

Filed under
Software

Mozilla announced Shumway this week, a new research project that seeks to create an open SWF (Adobe Flash) run-time environment to make Flash more open and for exposing SWF capabilities to platforms where the Adobe file-format wasn't backed by an official Flash Player.

Shumway is still very experimental and not working for all SWF content, but it's moving along and evolving rapidly. Shumway should be especially interesting for mobile devices where Flash Player support tends to be lacking.

rest herfe




More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 17.1 “Rebecca” KDE RC released!

The team is proud to announce the release of Linux Mint 17.1 “Rebecca” KDE RC. Read more

Get Out the Vote for LinuxQuestions.org

One great thing about this poll — probably the best thing about this poll — is that each of the categories has an extremely wide range of candidates, and there are programs in many of the categories that I’ve never heard of. Hearing about them for the first time, I get to try them out. So not only is it fun — yeah, I think voting is fun (so shoot me) — it’s also educational. Read more

SuperX 3.0 Beta Released

SuperX, a relatively new distribution, just released beta for its upcoming 3.0 release. SuperX is a KDE centric distribution, and focuses on giving a polished KDE experience (a marketing statement, SuperX guys use). Read more

Google and ODF

  • Fuzz about Google supporting odf
    First of all because the support comes way too late. Secondly because its not even close to be good. Back several years ago Google was politically supporting the process of getting odf approved as an open standard but they never really bothered. The business was clearly to keep both odf and ooxml/docx out of their products and keep their own proprietary document format. Implementing good and solid interoperability is actually not difficult but it is a huge task. Google could have done this three or four years ago if they wanted to. But they didn't. Both proprietary software vendors has been busy making interoperability difficult while the providers of true open standards has been improving interoperability month by month.
  • Google Promises Better Compatibility with Open Source Documents
    Google (GOOG) may soon be taking open OpenDocumentFormat (ODF), the native file format in virtually all modern open source word processors, like LibreOffice and OpenOffice, more seriously. That's according to a statement from Google's open source chief speaking about the future of the company's cloud-based app suite.