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Kernel Log - Coming in 3.7 (Part 1): Filesystems & storage

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Linux

Last weekend, Linus Torvalds released the fifth release candidate for Linux 3.7; he was happy to point out that only a few, mostly minor, changes were submitted for this RC. As usual, Torvalds and his fellow developers had already incorporated all major new features at the start of the Linux 3.7 development cycle. Since it is rare that further major changes are integrated during the stabilisation phase, the Kernel Log can already provide a comprehensive overview of the most important advancements in the new Linux version, which is expected to arrive in early to mid-December.

The overview will be presented in the customary series of articles that will cover the various Linux areas. The first article below describes the most important new features in the kernel's filesystems and storage hardware support; subsequent articles will discuss the kernel's graphics drivers, network support, architecture code and other hardware drivers.

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