Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Fedora 18 Pre-Release Report

Filed under
Linux

I've been remixing Fedora 18 pre-release for quite a while now. As you may recall The Fedora Project has delayed the release of Fedora 18 Beta several times now... mainly due to blocker bugs in their new installer and Fedora Updater (fedup). I think the rest of the distribution has benefited from the delays because I've been running it a while and it has been very solid for me... as or more solid than Fedora 17. In fact, Fedora 17 and Fedora 18 share a lot in common... because a Fedora release, during its lifecycle, gets a lot of updates and upgrades.

I started by putting Fedora 18 on my netbook. Then I put it on my home desktop system. I ran it for more than a month... oh, and by the way, I disable the updates-testing repository. Since it has been so solid on my hardware at home I finally decided, perhaps being a little haphazard, to put it on my workstation at work. When did I decide to do that? Well... I picked the day before Thanksgiving about 1 hour before it was time to go home. Care to follow me on my journey?

rest here




Fedora 18 experience

I started with the Alpha, and encountered many Fedora problems, but no problems with the applications. For maintenance, I used yum and yumex. yumex allowed me to run via root logon.

The other day I wiped clean the test disk reserved for live testing of distributions and installed the pre beta tc9 and selected btfrs file system. Everything worked faithfully.

I did not do timings, but Fedora 18 appears to boot more quickly than does F17. I attribute that to btfrs, with its larger sector size. (to be confirmed). The day following the installation of TC9 pre-beta, the real beta was released.
I did ask if it was worth redoing the installation with the rc candidate, but got no answer. I will assume that TC9 and RC candidate are one and the same.

F18 is nice, Gnome is a little different. I still have my complaints about the top left corner action.

Today I was asking myself how I could switch modes with Gnome actions. The default screen should be "Show all icons", and with a click, I should have the little window appear where I would invoke an application or filter the list of icons appearing on the screen.

Another feature would be to emulate3 the Mint Cinnamon action of supporting persistent virtual desktops. That idea is great. It saves me from having carpal tunnel problems with the excessive number of left button mouse clicks.

One popular website provided a set of comparisons of btfrs versus ext4. According to their tests (using one I7 computer), Ext4 was faster in all tests. I am not sure that btfrs is noticably slower, as that is not my experience

System clock for this website

Is the clock for this site using gmt-6. I filed my review at 14:34 and it shows as being posted at 13:34

re:system clock

The system clock is gmt-6 w/daylight savings, but the site software I set manually for daylight savings and back so it'll match the system (that changes automagically).

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Google beefs Linux up kernel defenses in Android

Future versions of Android will be more resilient to exploits thanks to developers' efforts to integrate the latest Linux kernel defenses into the operating system. Android's security model relies heavily on the Linux kernel that sits at its core. As such, Android developers have always been interested in adding new security features that are intended to prevent potentially malicious code from reaching the kernel, which is the most privileged area of the operating system. Read more

Fork YOU! Sure, take the code. Then what?

There's an old adage in the open source world – if you don't like it, fork it. This advice, often given in a flippant manner, makes it seem like forking a piece of software is not a big deal. Indeed, forking a small project you find on GitHub is not a big deal. There's even a handy button to make it easy to fork it. Unlike many things in programming though, that interaction model, that simplicity of forking, does not scale. There is no button next to Debian that says Fork it! Thinking that all you need to do to make a project yours is to fork it is a fundamental misunderstanding of what large free/open source projects are – at their hearts, they are communities. One does not simply walk into Debian and fork it. One can, on the other hand, walk out of a project, bring all the other core developers along, and essentially leave the original an empty husk. This is what happened when LibreOffice forked away from the once-mighty OpenOffice; it's what happened when MariaDB split from MySQL; and it's what happened more recently when the core developers behind ownCloud left the company and forked the code to start their own project, Nextcloud. They also, thankfully, dropped the silly lowercase first letter thing. Nextcloud consists of the core developers who built ownCloud, but who were not, and, judging by the very public way this happened, had not been, in control of the direction of the product for some time. Read more

Proprietary and Microsoft Software

Pithos 1.2

  • New Version of Linux Pandora Client ‘Pithos’ Released
    A new release of open-source Linux Pandora client Pithos is now available for download.
  • Pithos 1.2 Improves The Open-Source/Linux Pandora Desktop Experience
    Chances are if you've ever dealt with Pandora music streaming from the Linux desktop you've encountered Pithos as the main open-source solution that works out quite well. Released today was Pithos 1.2 and it ships with numerous enhancements for this GPLv3-licensed Pandora desktop client. Pithos 1.2 adds a number of new keyboard shortcuts for the main window, initial support for translations, an explicit content filter option, reduced CPU usage with Ubuntu's default theme, redesigned dialogs and other UI elements, and more.