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Interview with Linus Torvalds from Linux Format 163

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Linux
Interviews

As regular readers and podcast listeners will know, we were fortunate enough to meet Linus Torvalds at the end of July for an interview that was published in Linux Format 163. Well, here it is - complete with Linus' attempts to defend PulseAudio, the moment he nearly threw us out when he finds an iPhone, and his opinions on everything from Android and Apple's Macbook Air, to KDE, Gnome and the Raspberry Pi.

The Linux kernel is what everything else runs on top of, so it's the key to everything that a Linux device can do. It's in your Android phone. It's in the computers that run the servers at Google, Amazon and all the other web services that we take for granted...

It powers the database that US immigration uses to decide if you are who you say you are, it's deep under the Alps searching for new particles at CERN, and it's even on unmanned drones searching for drugs traffickers in the Caribbean. Linux is everywhere.

We at Linux Format were lucky enough to speak to Linus Torvalds, the man who wrote the original Linux kernel and still works as its maintainer.

We went to his house, we stroked his dog, we almost killed his wife in an embarrassing car crash, but despite that socially awkward automotive incident, he didn't seem overly annoyed by our presence.

rest here




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