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Ubuntu Linux and Windows 8: Head-to-Head at Last

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Microsoft
Ubuntu

Canonical may have ultimately changed its mind about "Avoid the pain of Windows 8" -- the slogan that accompanied the original launch of Ubuntu 12.10 "Quantal Quetzal" earlier this fall, but like so many deeply compelling notions, it seems to have staying power here in the Linux blogosphere.

That indeed is why more than a few Linux fans have viewed Windows 8 with jubilation rather than dread -- it may, after all, prove to be Linux's next big shot at broader desktop use -- and it's also surely behind an intriguing little story that popped up recently over at PCWorld.

"10 reasons to choose Ubuntu 12.10 over Windows 8" was the name of said piece, and it was penned by two intrepid souls who were apparently not only fearless in the face of a heavily MTBS-afflicted audience, but also fortunate to be in possession of fireproof clothes, so hot were some of the flames that followed.

Both freedom fighters remain undaunted.




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