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My Desktop Dreams

more touchscreen control
30% (282 votes)
more effects and widgets
3% (30 votes)
more simplicity
15% (144 votes)
more traditional
16% (151 votes)
more configuration
18% (171 votes)
more integrated apps
4% (42 votes)
just a window manager
8% (72 votes)
commandline only
2% (18 votes)
other
5% (45 votes)
Total votes: 955

I just want .....

I just f'ing want something that doesn't look like a f'ing tablet or a smart phone. It's a desktop ffs!

Openbox works well for my needs

Back in the days of Gnome 2.32, I was a happy Gnome user. When Unity and Gnome 3 happened, I turned into a "desktop drifter" of sorts with no permanent home. Upon discovering Xubuntu and Xfce, I was happy... but only for a short while; soon after installing Xubuntu I discovered the world of minimally-designed and lightweight window managers, and fell in love. I am now a happy user of CrunchBang Linux Waldorf (based on Debian Wheezy/testing) with Openbox.

I do care about the desktop if it gets in my way

I think some of the options are rather silly and obscure the underlying issues. Still, if one groups them like this ...

more touchscreen control 10 votes
more effects and widgets 4 votes
more configuration 53 votes
more integrated apps 20 votes
----------
MORE BLING 87 votes

more simplicity 51 votes
more traditional 64 votes
just a window manager 32 votes
commandline only 4 votes
----------
LESS BLING 151 votes

other 10 votes

... it becomes obvious that a majority of voters prefer more simple and functional desktop environments over the infantile and distracting toy shops that KDE, Gnome and Unity are today. When one also considers the "more configuration" option to be a given for any user, there's actually a rather large majority for sane, sober, secular, rational and enlightened desktop environments.

(Sample taken Tue Dec 11 21:00:00 CET 2012)

I don't care about the desktop as long it does not stand in my w

way ...

What blocks Linux or FOSS is not features in the Desktop. The desktop in just a box,
a nice wrap around the applications.

Applications in Linux really suck compared to their windows counter parts sometimes.
Compare the amount of PDF readers who can do annotations in Windows and Linux.

People are trapped in windows to MS OFFICE, and sometimes the only way to move them,
is to offer a better alternative.

Although I use Linux and FreeBSD, I am really pissed off sometimes about the quality of
applications .

Oz

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