Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Linux kernel dumps 386 chip support

Filed under
Linux

Linus Torvalds has announced the Linux kernel no longer supports Intel's 80386 processors.

Reg readers will doubtless recall that the 386 debuted way back in 1985 and made something of a splash when the chip found its way into PCs made by Compaq before an IBM PC bearing the processor reached the market.

386s screamed along, by the standards of the day, at up to 33 mHZ. At that speed Windows 3.1 did not disgrace itself. By the time the 486 and Pentium came along, 386s dropped out of sight.

rest here




I don't like it.

I don't like it. This is linux, not windows. what next? remove support for 32bit processors?
I use a 32bit (PAE) kernel on a Intel(R) Core(TM)2 CPU E7500 and I have no plans to ever move to a 64bit kernel.
I run proprietary 32bit applications and I have no intention of using the multilib crap.

Your complaining about

Your complaining about something that hasn't even happened? Also, do you have any 80386 chips around?

Luddite

I hope you and your rotary phone enjoy standing in the way of progress for the other 7 billion people on the planet.

"make us upgrade our Doom rig"

While I generally agree with your overall premise, but we shouldn't be dropping support for hardware that some folks are still using.

one example

Except

The support isn't retroactively removed.

If you CHOOSE to run ancient hardware, you still have numerous choices of ancient software to run on it.

The only option you're losing is upgrading as the rest of the world passes you and your dinosaur hardware by.

Hardly seems like a tragedy.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.

More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation and Linux

openSUSE Tumbleweed Users Get Git 2.11, Xfce 4.12.3, FFmpeg 3.2.1 & Mesa 13.0.2

openSUSE's Douglas DeMaio reports on the latest Open Source and GNU/Linux technologies that landed in the repositories of the openSUSE Tumbleweed rolling operating system. Read more

What Is A VPN Connection? Why To Use VPN?

We all have heard about VPN sometime. Most of us normal users of internet use it. To bypass the region based restrictions of services like Netflix or Youtube ( Yes, youtube has geo- restrictions too). In fact, VPN is actually mostly used for this purpose only. ​ Read
more

The Libreboot C201 from Minifree is really really really ridiculously open source

Open source laptops – ones not running any commercial software whatsoever – have been the holy grail for free software fans for years. Now, with the introduction of libreboot, a truly open source boot firmware, the dream is close to fruition. The $730 laptop is a bog standard piece of hardware but it contains only open source software. The OS, Debian, is completely open source and to avoid closed software the company has added an Atheros Wi-Fi dongle with open source drivers rather than use the built-in Wi-Fi chip. Read more