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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 487

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Linux

Welcome to this year's 51st issue of DistroWatch Weekly! The popularity of Arch Linux, combined with the project's philosophy that appeals to more advanced Linux users, has resulted in an explosion of Arch-based distributions with a variety of desktop environments and user-friendly features. One of them is Cinnarch, a live distro that marries Arch Linux with Cinnamon (Linux Mint's ambitious fork of GNOME Shell). The result is an interesting rolling-release distribution which is still undergoing rapid development, but which has a potential to deliver a traditional desktop user interface built from cutting-edge software. Read below Jesse Smith's first impressions of this relative newcomer to the Linux distro scene. In the news section, Mandriva goes ahead with registering a non-profit association that will continue development of the once highly successful distribution, Fedora prepares to launch a new online publication designed for users and developers of Red Hat's community project, Linux Mint maintainers update the roadmap and feature list of the upcoming version 15, and Gentoo developers discuss the complexities of copyright assignments in loosely-knit software communities. Also in this issue, update on openSUSE's Tumbleweed, the Questions and Answers section that deals with OpenJDK and Oracle's Java, and an introduction to the Xubuntu-based Emmabuntüs. Happy reading!

Content:

Reviews: First look at Cinnarch 2012.11.22
News: Mandriva registers OpenMandriva association, Fedora launches new magazine, Mint updates roadmap, openSUSE empties Tumbleweed repositories, Gentoo discusses copyright assignments
Questions and answers: OpenJDK versus Oracle Java
Released last week: Slax 7.0, Webconverger 16.0, LuninuX OS 12.10
Upcoming releases: FreeBSD 9.1, PC-BSD 9.1
New additions: Emmabuntüs
New distributions: DBLab, LinuxBBQ, Tiki OS
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