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F2fs flash-friendly filesystem integrated into Linux

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Linux

Linus Torvalds has integrated code to support the F2fs filesystem into the Linux kernel's main development branch; this branch is currently used to prepare Linux 3.8 (1, 2, 3). Introduced in October, F2fs is a filesystem that was mainly developed by Samsung employees and is specially tailored for storage media that use flash memory chips and a rather simple Flash Translation Layer (FTL) – for example USB flash drives, memory cards (eMMC, SD cards, ...) and the storage media that are included in cameras, tablets and smartphones.

F2fs is a Log-structured File System (LFS). Like Btrfs, such filesystems use Copy-on-Write (COW) – when a file is overwritten, the filesystem will, therefore, store the new data in a different place and delete the reference to the old data.

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