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How Linux reads your fingerprints, helps national security

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Linux

Gunnar Hellekson has many awesome-sounding job titles.

He's the chief technology strategist for Red Hat's US Public Sector group, where he works with government departments to show them how open source can meet their needs, and with systems integrators to show them what they can do to provide the government with what it needs.

He's co-chair of Open Source for America, which campaigns for software that has been funded by the tax-payer to be open sourced, so that all Americans can benefit from it. He's also on the boards of the Military Open Source Working Group, Civic Commons and the SIIA Software Division.

He's a clever chap with the ear of some pretty influential people, so we sar down with him for a chat.

rest here




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