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Turn your Linux PC into a gaming machine

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

Linux-based operating systems have long been the alternative OS for us PC users, but there are several reasons why they haven't garnered the mainstream following they perhaps deserve.

Most of the issues stem from the unfamiliar way they work compared with the operating system we've all used a million times before: Windows.

Things are changing quickly though. Component compatibility is something the manufacturers will have to become more au fait with though, and we're going to investigate just how well the big players are doing right now.

We've picked some of the most vital parts for penguin-based systems - the processor, graphics card and solid state drives - to see how they fair in the alternative operating system.

Can you still be a gaming, component-swapping guru running a Linux-based PC? We say hell yes, but you're going to have to be picky with the parts for penguins.

Read here




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