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Open source "needs to ignore" Richard Stallman

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OSS

A war has erupted in the world of Open Sauce, which could mark the end of an era.

Paolo Bonzini, who is the maintainer of the Free Software Foundation's GNU grep and GNU sed projects has quit after eight years.

Bonzini just signed off on a release of a new version of GNU sed, but told the world that he was severing his links with the two software initiatives.

This was due to technical and administrative disagreements with the Free Software Foundation and its head, and guru Richard Stallman.

Bonzini moaned that he was prevented from improving coding standards and change from one language to another for coding.

He said that sometimes it was good having Stallman taking executive decisions because it would be impossible to convince a diverse group such as the group of GNU maintainers to agree on coding standards for C.

But sometimes all Stallman had to offer on the topic was "We still prefer C to C++, because C++ is so ugly".

Stallman's attitude had meant that GNU coding standards have not seen any update in years and were entirely obsolete.

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