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The Document Foundation 2012 in Review

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LibO

Italo Vignoli today published lots of cool graphs and stats demonstating the growth and other accomplishments over the course of 2012. From the growth in number of contributors to high-profile rollouts to increasing numbers of downloads, 2012 has been a banner year. He said, "Looking back, it has been amazing."

Italo Vignoli today published lots of cool graphs and stats demonstating the growth and other accomplishments over the course of 2012. From the growth in number of contributors to high-profile rollouts to increasing numbers of downloads, 2012 has been a banner year. He said, "Looking back, it has been amazing."

Starting with the contributor list, LibreOffice had 379 contributors at the start of the year, but that number had grown to 567 by Christmas 2012. The Document Foundation also announced 14 LibreOffice releases in 2012 and the team is currently working on LibreOffice 4.0, which should be released in February 2012.

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