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Linux Heavies Weigh in on Grid / Virtualization Directions

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Linux

What is it about the Linux operating system that makes it so well-suited for Grid computing, virtualization and clustering? In today's new release of the Globus Consortium Journal (www.globusconsortium.org/journal), Linux and Grid professionals answer that question.

Highlights include:

* A year ago, the headlines suggested that Xen had won the Linux
virtualization battle. But has the delay in the Xen patch for Linux kernel support left the door open for VMWare? The Globus Consortium asks Andrew Morton, chief maintainer of the Linux kernel at Open Source Development Labs.

* Ian Foster catches up with Irving Wladawsky-Berger, VP of Technical Strategy at IBM, for his latest thoughts on the progress of Grid, and other emerging technologies that IBM is actively contributing to.

* Carl Drisko -- Service Line Principal at Novell -- explains why Linux is the most widely used OS for Grids, and discusses the need for more communication between the Grid and Linux communities.

* Pioneer Donald Becker (now CTO of Penguin Computing) provides some context on the evolution of Linux clustering technology.

* Adam Fineberg -- Vice President of Engineering at Linux management vendor Levanta -- describes some of the key technical characteristics that make Linux so well-suited for clustering, Grids and virtualization.

The Globus Consortium Journal (www.globusconsortium.org/journal) is a discussion forum dedicated to open source Grid computing issues for enterprise developers and business decision makers. Globus Consortium members include IBM, Intel, Cisco, HP, Nortel, Sun and Univa.

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