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Rumors Running Wild About Ubuntu's Top-Secret New Product

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Ubuntu

Right in the middle of yet another double Peppermint Penguin, Linux Girl's Tux Phone began screaming. There was fresh news to be covered, and with a hefty twist of mystery, to boot!

"Save the date: Jan 2 -- Ubuntu set to disrupt a new ecosystem," read the urgent message. "Ubuntu will announce a brand-new product."

Luckily for her readers, Linux Girl is always on duty. She donned her mask and a fresh cape and set off for Canonical HQ.

rest here




Ubuntu top secret Jan 2 announcement

Seen all the hype and my money is on some kind of OSX emulation layer (InCider © Raymondillo Dec 2012) HO HO HO. To allow Ubuntu users to run Appleware on Linux boxes.

But I stand to be corrected.

Ray Smile

Happy New Year to Sue and Everyone at Tuxmachines.

Ubuntu secret? Run Appleware??

That's funny! I didn't know Apple had any 'ware' worth running even if you could manage to get it for free. Guess it might be a good exercise in programming but hardly worth the effort. Confused

Ubuntu announcement

Not sure about that never had an Apple product. But I know that UbuntWorth would love to emulate that prized fruit and make a few bucks doing it. So don't totally discount the possibility.

Of course one could have said the same about Microsoft 'ware' but the Wine project is still a thriving project used by many because of work etc.

Anyway was only my tuppennyworth Smile

P.S. might not be InCider I understand that already exists so Cyder or InCyder or Cydr who knows.

It makes good fun guessing over the holiday.

Happy new year all

FoneBuntu

OK so my guess about cyder was wrong. Now we know the big secret was Fonebuntu or whatever its going to be called.

So here is my latest speculation. Fonebuntus only hope of getting any sales is if it has a program "AndBuntu" (copyright me) to run android apps under the Ubuntu fone OS.

Smile (hides in shelter awaits flack)

re: FoneBuntu

Don't worry about hiding, I bet your idea is on somebody's drawing board somewhere over there. Big Grin

FoneBuntu

Hurray, Now we can have a crappy interface everywhere we go!! Rolling On The Floor

Fonebuntu

Crappy interface so true and so common. Even M$ have one now. Well they had one anyway but now its glossy too.

Still on Lucid here and trying all comers to see where to go next. Thank Dog for this site and Distrowatch so I can see the widest range of choices.

Current fav is either back to Debian or on to Scientific Linux which I have used for about 2 years on and off.

Mint mate has some possibilities but I am a bit fed up with no so benevolent distro-dictators.Sad

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