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Manjaro 0.8.3 KDE: Simply getting better

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Linux

I reviewed the last two releases of Manjaro Linux (0.8 and 0.8.2) earlier this year and was quite impressed by the last release. There were some glitches of course, like high RAM usage, in spite of being based on Arch Linux. But Manjaro has its own advantages as well like rolling release. To be honest, I wasn't using using Manjaro on a regular basis - relying more on Linux Mint and Archbang for productivity purposes. Hence, when the new updated release of Manjaro (0.8.3) came out, I had to do a fresh install to try it out. Manjaro 0.8.3 has now Cinnamon, Mate, KDE and XFCE versions - Gnome is left out for obvious reasons. Both 32 and 64 bit ISOs are available for download.

KDE is now a days my favorite desktop environment, after getting a bit fed up with Gnome. Given the updated release of Manjaro has KDE 4.9.4, I downloaded it first, though I guess Manjaro XFCE is the most popular one. The 32-bit KDE ISO is about 1.6 GB is size, almost same as Manjaro 0.8.2 KDE. I did a live-boot on the following three systems:

rest here




More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • The one-millionth commit: The search for the lucky Linux kernel contributor

    This week has been “a week of millions” for the Linux Foundation, with our announcement that over 1 million people have taken our free Introduction to Linux course. As part of the research for our recently published 2020 Linux Kernel History Report, the Kernel Project itself determined that it had surpassed one million code commits. Here is how we established the identity of this lucky Kernel Project contributor.

  • Meet the contributor of the 1-millionth commit: Ricardo Neri
  • Welcome to the September 2020 edition of Friends of GNOME Update!

    Several Foundation staff presented at GNOME Africa Onboard Virtual. Kristi Progri helped kick off the event with Foundation vice-president Regina Nkemchor Adejo. M de Blanc and Rosanna Yuen talked about the GNOME code of conduct. Melissa Wu reprised her session on What it’s Like to Be New to GNOME. Rosanna will also be presenting at All Things Open. On October 20 at 3:30pm ET, you can catch “GNOME Foundation Then and Now — 20 years of bringing free software to the desktop.”

  • Intentional Documentation

    I mentioned earlier that documenting data science work is significantly different than documenting engineering work. One of they key differences is that data scientists tend to do more once-and-done work than engineers. Data science is a race against irrelevance. The world is changing around us and we need to deliver insights before our findings go stale. It's impossible and inefficient to try to document all of this one-off work. Only a small portion of the resulting documentation would ever be used. Even worse, the useful documentation will be hidden in a sea of useless noise. Instead, data scientists should focus on keeping good work records, contextualizing their analyses, and preparing themselves to backfill documentation later.

  • Expanded extension support in Firefox for Android Nightly

    A few weeks ago, we mentioned that we were working on increasing extension support in the Firefox for Android Nightly pre-release channel. Starting September 30, you will be able to install any extension listed on addons.mozilla.org (AMO) in Nightly. This override was created for extension developers and advanced users who are interested in testing for compatibility, so it’s not easily accessible. Installing untested extensions can lead to unexpected outcomes; please be judicious about the extensions you install. Also, since most developers haven’t been able to test and optimize their extensions for the new Android experience, please be kind if something doesn’t work the way it should. We will remove negative user reviews about extension performance in Nightly. Currently, Nightly uses the Collections feature on AMO to install extensions. You will need to create a collection on AMO and change an advanced setting in Nightly in order to install general extensions.

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, firefox, libvirt, and podman), Debian (firefox-esr and nss), Gentoo (bitcoind, chromium, cifs-utils, gpsd, libuv, and xen), Mageia (firefox, gnutls, mediawiki, samba, and Thunderbird), openSUSE (brotli and cifs-utils), Red Hat (audiofile, bluez, cloud-init, cpio, cups, curl, dbus, dnsmasq, e2fsprogs, evince and poppler, exiv2, expat, firefox, fontforge, freeradius, freerdp, glib2 and ibus, glibc, httpd, hunspell, ipa, kernel, kernel-rt, libcroco, libexif, libmspack, libpng, librabbitmq, libsndfile, libsrtp, libssh2, libtiff, libvirt, libvpx, libwmf, libxml2, libxslt, mariadb, mod_auth_openidc, NetworkManager, nss and nspr, okular, OpenEXR, openldap, openwsman, pcp, python, python-pillow, python3, qemu-kvm, qemu-kvm-ma, qt5-qtbase, samba, SDL, spamassassin, squid, subversion, systemd, tigervnc, tomcat, unoconv, and webkitgtk4), SUSE (bcm43xx-firmware, nodejs8, pdns, python-pip, and xen), and Ubuntu (libapreq2, netqmail, samba, and tomcat6).

Python Programming

  • Python Meeting Düsseldorf - 2020-09-30

    The following text is in German, since we're announcing a regional user group meeting in Düsseldorf, Germany.

  • Making Concurrent HTTP requests with Python AsyncIO

    Python 3.4 added the asyncio module to the standard library. Asyncio allows us to run IO-bound tasks asynchronously to increase the performance of our program. Common IO-bound tasks include calls to a database, reading and writing files to disk, and sending and receiving HTTP requests. A Django web application is a common example of an IO-bound application. We’ll demonstrate the usage of concurrent HTTP requests by fetching prices for stock tickers. The only third party package we’ll use is httpx. Httpx is very similar to the popular requests package, but httpx supports asyncio.

  • Cogito, Ergo Sumana: Changes Coming To Pip In October 2020

    Changes Coming To Pip In October 2020: People who deal with Python: Changes are coming to pip, Python's package installation tool, in October 2020. Please share this migration guide and our video with your circles. [...] I'm working on improving the Python packaging toolchain, foundational work that will (in the long run) make the whole Python experience way less confusing. In the short term this may mess with some people's workflows, so we want lots of people to hear about it now.

  • Production ready Django App in Amazon Lightsail - Weblog

    This article is based in this documentation page and this video where Mike Coleman takes us how to deploy a Django application on Amazon Lightsail. It was also considered two articles from Bitnami (Getting started with Django, and Deploy a Django project).

  • Python's map(): Processing Iterables Without a Loop

    Python’s map() is a built-in function that allows you to process and transform all the items in an iterable without using an explicit for loop, a technique commonly known as mapping. map() is useful when you need to apply a transformation function to each item in an iterable and transform them into a new iterable. map() is one of the tools that support a functional programming style in Python.

  • Pandas Count Occurrences in Column – i.e. Unique Values

    In this Pandas tutorial, you are going to learn how to count occurrences in a column. There are occasions in data science when you need to know how many times a given value occurs. This can happen when you, for example, have a limited set of possible values that you want to compare. Another example can be if you want to count the number of duplicate values in a column. Furthermore, we may want to count the number of observations there is in a factor or we need to know how many men or women there are in the data set, for example.

  • Cleaning Text Data With Python

    Machine Learning is super powerful if your data is numeric. What do you do, however, if you want to mine text data to discover hidden insights or to predict the sentiment of the text. What, for example, if you wanted to identify a post on a social media site as cyber bullying. The first concept to be aware of is a Bag of Words. When training a model or classifier to identify documents of different types a bag of words approach is a commonly used, but basic, method to help determine a document's class. A bag of words is a representation of text as a set of independent words with no relationship to each other. It is called a “bag” of words, because any information about the order or structure of words in the document is discarded.

  • Quit Virtualenv and use Docker

    Don't get me wrong, I really like virtualenv and it's pretty useful in some scenarios. But sometimes you have to deal with OS dependencies and that forces you to install new packages and it can get a bit messy in some scenarios.

Purism/Librem, Librem Mini, and Librem 5 Updates

  • Desktop and Phone Convergence

    The Librem 5 is more than a phone, it’s a full desktop computer in your pocket designed to be just as mobile as you are.

  • Video Editing with KDenLive and the Librem Mini part 2: Keyframe Animations

    Last week we introduced you to a premier workflow for film editors and videographers using free software and freedom-respecting hardware – the Librem Mini and a video editing suite called KDenLive. We also dived into the features of KDenLive and how to achieve certain tasks like using chroma key to remove backgrounds and place objects in new environments. In this article we are going to focus on another important video creation task: keyframe animations. In the video below, we will demonstrate how we achieved a visual in a promo video displaying the workstation power of the Librem Mini, during a transition from a KDenLive screen recording and video footage of a colorful miniature train ride for children on display. Using an image of the minature train captured in a screenshot of the very first frame in the video, I was able to animate the train over the footage of the prior scene to create a captivating custom transition.

  • Software Development Progress July and August 2020

    This is another incarnation of the software development progress for the Librem 5. This time for July and August 2020 (weeks 27-35). Some items are covered in more detail in separate blog posts at https://puri.sm/news. The idea of this summary is so you can have a closer look at the coding and design side of things. It also shows how much we’re standing on the shoulders of giants reusing existing software and how contributions are flowing back and forth between upstream and downstream projects. This quickly gets interesting since we’re upstream for some projects (e.g. calls, phosh, chatty) and downstream for others (e.g Debian, Linux kernel, GNOME). So these reports are usually rather link heavy pointing to individual merge requests on https://source.puri.sm/ or to the upstream side (like e.g. GNOME’s gitlab). New software releases have an extra section so if you’re using phosh, squeekbord, phoc, chatty, etc. outside of PureOS this section might be worth a quick look.

today's howtos