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Enlightenment 17 (E17) Complete Desktop Review

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Software

Enlightenment 17 brings 12 years of development to your fingertips. Development for this version began in December 2000, and though we have seen many previews, the finished product has finally been unveiled. Now you can get a small taste of the E17 desktop, and check out some of the latest features along the way.

What Is Enlightenment 17?

Enlightenment is actually older than many alternative window managers or full desktop environments. Dispite its age, Enlightenment has always had its eyes on the future. The Enlightenment 17 desktop is a traditional X11 style desktop, with numerous appearance and functionality enhancements. E17 offers a maximum level of effects and decorations, while at the same time guaranteeing optimal system performance.

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