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The Linux Setup - Miriam Ruiz, Debian Developer

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Linux
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Another Debian developer! Miriam has a low-drama setup. She simply uses Debian to do what she needs to do. I find it interesting that she desktop hops a bit (she’s now working with GNOME), but at the same time, it’s very cool that she’s open to trying new desktop environments. In general, her setup seems to be evolving over time, which is inspiring to those of us who are a bit entrenched in our own workflows.

What distribution do you run on your main desktop/laptop?

I run Debian GNU/Linux on all of my computers. It’s the distribution I’m most familiar with, it’s a good option for most purposes and architectures, it has a good support community in mailing lists and forums, and it already includes most of the software I usually need. And when I need something that isn’t already there, I usually package it myself.

What software do you depend upon with this distribution?

It depends on what I’m using at the moment. The things I use the most are the shell console, a programming environment (an editor and gcc), Mozilla Firefox (with a lot of add-ons), and programs like LibreOffice, GIMP and VLC.

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