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Maybe it's time to think about LTSP?

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Linux

With austerity being the watchword of our times being able to get as much out of that IT hardware you have is as important as ever, more so when the industry is in shift at an OS level and maybe the hardware you have isn’t quite up to the task of Windows 8?

I have put this post together for a personal reference, it it helps someone else then that’s a good thing.

Thin Client computing is a good example of how the IT world goes round in a circle, 30 or so years ago computers were huge beasts filling rooms the size of offices. To attach to them you had a termina, that terminal had no hard disk and everything you did was done directly on the “mainframe” While examples of this style of computing never died they were quickly outpaced by the computers we know today where the processing and computing is done at your desk and the files then saved to a server. (The client server model).

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