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Review: Wikis In The Enterprise

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Software

If you've "googled" any topic recently--and who hasn't--you probably received a link to that topic in Wikipedia, the best living example of the power of online collaboration using wiki software. If you follow the link to Wikipedia, you'll find information about your topic and--this is the living part--you'll be solicited to help flesh out the content by editing and adding to the text about the topic. More than 85,000 people around the world have already contributed to a million-plus Wikipedia articles in less than five years.

The engine behind this demonstration of collaborative clout is Mediawiki, an open-source wiki distribution. Mediawiki is one of more than a dozen popular open-source wiki distributions at SourceForge.net, which lists hundreds of such wikis and related wiki projects.

For those of you not inclined to implement open-source code or who want to outsource your wiki implementation, we found just four companies that offer commercial wikis complete with tech support. We invited each of these vendors to participate in a hands-on review at our Real-World Labs®, at Syracuse University. All four--Atlassian Software Systems, CustomerVision, JotSpot and Socialtext.

Full Story.

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