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Consort Desktop Environment fork of GNOME Classic announced

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Software

The developers of the SolusOS Linux distribution have announced the Consort Desktop Environment. This user interface for Linux systems is based on code from the same components that currently provide GNOME 3's fallback mode, also known as GNOME Classic.

This mode works without 3D acceleration and provides a desktop which resembles that of GNOME 2; however, the associated code will be removed in GNOME 3.8 – among the reasons given is that nobody has maintained the code base and that the interface appears to have undergone very little testing in recent times.

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