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DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 491

Filed under
Linux

Welcome to this year's third issue of DistroWatch Weekly! Fuduntu is an unusual distribution in that it uses a fairly outdated base system and desktop (GNOME 2), but keeps many of the more visible applications continuously updated. It's still a young project, but it continues to evolve and it will be interesting to see how it copes with the package update process in the future. Jesse Smith installed version 2013.1 to take a look at the latest release from a project that seems to have found a good compromise between the much-loved old and the intriguingly new desktop and software.

In the news section, Fedora 18 was finally released and it comes with a most extensive choice of desktop user interfaces to date, SolusOS announces a fork of GNOME 3 Fallback mode that will ship with its upcoming release, and OS4 attempts to build a distribution that focuses on satisfying a general desktop user in terms of features and desktop layout. Also in this issue, a quick Questions and Answers section on accessing encrypted disk drives from a live CD, an introduction to a Debian-based distribution with Trinity (a KDE 3 fork) as its default desktop, and the usual regular sections. Happy reading!

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Poll: You Say, ‘Ship Ubuntu Tablets by the Boatload’
    Granted, you’re a special audience with a special interest. For the most part you use Linux, and not because you’re a mooch and it doesn’t cost you anything, but because you recognize it as the best that’s available. Certainly it doesn’t hurt that it’s free and open source software. Indeed, you probably think that’s what makes it best, as you most likely see FOSS as the best software development model.
  • Canonical Might Drop Ubuntu Discourse
    Ubuntu Discourse was supposed to be a community hub for all things Ubuntu, but the project never really came out of prototype stage, and it's probably going to be closed.
  • Canonical Releases Snappy Ubuntu Core Images for Intel's NUC
  • Canonical releases Snappy Ubuntu Core for the Intel NUC IoT starter kit
    CANONICAL HAS announced the release of the Snappy Ubuntu Core lightweight operating system for another starter kit. The Intel NUS DE3815TY version is the first fruit of a Canonical and Intel project to create a standardised development platform for creating and testing x86 Internet of Things (IoT) projects.

4 things every Linux beginner should know

Linux-based operating systems are popular due to the wide range of flexibility they offer in terms of software and abilities. It can be a bit daunting to try to learn a new operating system and explore all of its benefits, or even know where to start. Since everything works a little different on Linux, there is quite a learning curve in order to get started. If you’re interested in the word of Linux, here are four things every first timer must know. Plus, if you want to dive more into Linux, there’s a sweet deal at the end of this article to help you learn the command line in Linux. Read more Also: Russia to ditch Windows OS, decides to join the Linux club Russian government abandoning Windows for Linux

GNOME: Maps shaping up for 3.20

So, we're soon approaching the UI freeze for GNOME 3.20. It's looking quite good when it comes to OpenStreetMap editing in Maps (among other things). But first I thought I was going to show-case another improvement, namely the expanded place bubbles (show information about places you search for on the map). Read more

The Influence of Debian in Linux Open Source Community

The Linux community, and the technology world in general, were shocked by the news of Ian’s Murdock tragic death a couple of weeks ago – and rightfully so. Ian’s legacy and vision as the founder of the Debian project not only influenced many others who went on to start their own distributions, but also were the means to create a rock-solid operating system that many individuals and businesses of all sizes have used for more than 20 years. Read more EOL:

  • Debian 6 LTS reaches end-of-life on February 29 - it's time to upgrade
    The Debian Long Term Support team has announced that Debian 6 - a long term support release - will stop receiving updates on February 29, 2016. Debian 6 was first released on February 6, 2011, and saw ten point releases while it was supported by the main nucleus of the Debian community. Since July 19, 2014, maintenance of Debian 6 has been left to the Long Term Support team.
  • Debian GNU/Linux 6.0 LTS "Squeeze" to Reach End-of-Life on February 29, 2016
    Today, February 12, 2016, the Debian Project has announced that the long-term supported Debian GNU/Linux 6.0 (Squeeze) is about to reach end-of-life (EOL) in approximately two weeks, on February 29, 2016.