Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A quick look at 3 distros based on “sid”

Filed under
Linux

With the recent release of Semplice Linux 3.0.0 at the beginning of the year, I was curious and decided to take a short look at the 3 active Linux distributions that use the “sid” unstable Debian repository for their sources. If you have any interest in a bleeding-edge distro, but want to stick with Debian, these are your best options. For people new to Linux, Debian is one of the oldest active versions, and has a huge set of programs and applications which are stored in a central location, called a repository. This trusted server is where you normally obtain most or all of the programs you use in your day to day life. Debian has the largest repository of any distribution, containing over 30,000 programs and libraries. Debian maintains 3 sets of these files: the most tested are called the “stable” set (called “squeeze” after one of the characters from the movie Toy Story) and are used to run servers or other important concerns. Then there is “testing” (known as “wheezy”) which are more recent versions, with most bugs fixed and perfectly suited for desktop use. Most of the best known Debian based Linux distributions are based on this branch.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Calculate Intro, OpenMandriva Review, and Mageia Delay

Today in Linux news Jessie Smith has a nice article on Gentoo-derivative Calculate Linux 14 in this week's Distrowatch Weekly. Linuxbsdos.com has a review of OpenMandriva Lx 2014.1, released last week. Mageia 5 Beta 1 is delayed and openSUSE 11.4 is "truly, finally dead." We have all this and more in tonight's Linux news recap. Read more

Early Morning Linux Voodoo at Denny’s

I could tell that he wasn’t comfortable turning over control of his laptop to a stranger, but after a few seconds I got a slight nod to the affirmative. I pulled the Acer over to my part of the counter and booted the Linux Mint KDE LTS I keep for just such purposes. As the computer accepted the DataStick as the boot option, I explained to Ed what I was doing. It was obvious he had no idea what I was talking about so we waited in awkward silence for the next few seconds. Finally, the Mint logo appeared on the screen. I opened Dolphin and located the Windows drive then asked him for the name of the file. He couldn’t remember but was sure it was a PDF. A few minutes later, I pulled a pen from my pocket and wrote down the number he needed and slid it back over to him with his laptop. Read more

Leftovers: Proprietary Software and Command Line

today's howtos