Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

A quick look at 3 distros based on “sid”

Filed under
Linux

With the recent release of Semplice Linux 3.0.0 at the beginning of the year, I was curious and decided to take a short look at the 3 active Linux distributions that use the “sid” unstable Debian repository for their sources. If you have any interest in a bleeding-edge distro, but want to stick with Debian, these are your best options. For people new to Linux, Debian is one of the oldest active versions, and has a huge set of programs and applications which are stored in a central location, called a repository. This trusted server is where you normally obtain most or all of the programs you use in your day to day life. Debian has the largest repository of any distribution, containing over 30,000 programs and libraries. Debian maintains 3 sets of these files: the most tested are called the “stable” set (called “squeeze” after one of the characters from the movie Toy Story) and are used to run servers or other important concerns. Then there is “testing” (known as “wheezy”) which are more recent versions, with most bugs fixed and perfectly suited for desktop use. Most of the best known Debian based Linux distributions are based on this branch.

rest here




More in Tux Machines

Linux Kernel 4.9.5 Released with Updated Radeon Drivers, KVM and PPC Fixes

A new maintenance update of the Linux 4.9 kernel series was announced today by renowned Linux kernel maintainer and developer Greg Kroah-Hartman, versioned 4.9.5. Coming only five days after the previous point release, Linux kernel 4.9.5 appears to be a big milestone that changes a total of 132 files, with 1515 insertions and 821 deletions. There are numerous improvements implemented in this fifth Linux 4.9 maintenance update, but first we'd like to remind you that Greg Kroah-Hartman recently marked this kernel branch as long-term supported (LTS), yet this is not apparent from kernel.org. Read more

Linux-based IoT gateway certified for Azure

IonSign’s “Gluon GMU491 Cloud Gateway” runs Debian on a TI Sitara SoC and aggregates multiple sensor and Modbus inputs for Azure and AWS. Finland-based IonSign has begun shipping an IoT gateway billed as a “complete industrial grade production unit for data collection and edge computing.” The Debian Linux based Gluon GMU491 Cloud Gateway is designed for collecting sensor, meter, fieldbus, or automation system data and packaging it for direct delivery to commercial cloud platforms. Read more

Red Hat Financial News