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Enlightenment’s E17: Ready for prime time?

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Software

After more than a decade of slow, but steady coding, Enlightenment version 0.17 or E17, was released late last year. The last time I took it for a spin was early last year. I was not too impressed then, and dropped it. But now that the “stable” version has been released, I decided to give it another try. I did that using an installation of the latest edition of Bodhi Linux, a desktop distribution based on Ubuntu.

Most of the features are great and I think it is ready for your desktop. But there are still some very rough edges. The basic thing you need to know about E17 is that it is resource-friendly, and will run on very old computers. But if it will run on old computers, imagine how it will fare on that “supercomputer” sitting on your desktop or on your lap. Also E17′s window-compositing is hardware-independent.

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